Category Archives: meetings

April 24: 1600th GSW Meeting and Early-Career Showcase at Carnegie EPL

The 1600th meeting of the Society will be held at the Carnegie Earth and Planets Laboratory, Broad Branch Road Campus. Directions are here: https://epl.carnegiescience.edu/about/our-campus/directions-to-epl

Parking is free on the campus, or on-street in the vicinity

This will be a special event, highlighting the work of early-career scientists. Ahead of the formal program, we will hold an informal gathering with food, beverages, and poster presentations by students, post-docs and other early-career workers. We welcome poster presentation contributions: please email Dan Doctor (dhdoctor@usgs.gov) if you have a poster to present!

Hors d’oeuvres and beverages will be served beginning at 6:30 p.m., during the poster presentations

***This will be a hybrid meeting***

If you wish to join the virtual Zoom webcast, please email geosocwash@gmail.com by Tuesday, April 23 for the information to join the webcast.

Formal program begins at 8:00 p.m, with the following speakers:

Emmanuel Codillo, Carnegie Earth and Planets Laboratory — Tracking carbon-rich magmas in the upper mantle using electrical conductivity

Vasilije Dobrosavljevic, Carnegie Earth and Planets Laboratory — Probing materials at Earth’s enigmatic core-mantle boundary landscape

Jennifer Kasbohm, Yale University/Carnegie Earth and Planets Laboratory — Calibrating timescales and measuring pCO2 to test the role of Columbia River Basalt volcanism in the Miocene Climate Optimum

March 27, GSW meeting at Cosmos Club

This will be an IN-PERSON meeting only. Three excellent talks will be presented:

ISABELLE COZZARELLI (U.S. Geological Survey) – Evolution of geochemical process understanding gained from long-term investigations of the Bemidji, Minnesota, terrestrial crude oil spill

GEOFFREY GILLEAUDEAU (George Mason University) – Perspectives on Neoproterozoic continental weathering and ocean oxygenation and its effect on the evolving biosphere

BEN KLIGMAN (Smithsonian Institution) – Searching for the hidden origins of living tetrapods in Triassic equatorial Pangaea

Come at 7:30 PM to socialize and imbibe, the meeting begins at 8 PM, and ends by 10 PM. Speaker bios and talk abstracts are available here.

GSW Meeting 1561 on 27 Jan 2021: Transform faults, Hydrology with GPS, and Icequakes on Enceladus

Wednesday, 27 January 2021

Jessica Warren, University of Delaware, “Global oceanic transform faults: the link between fluid flow and seismic behavior

Ellen Knappe, University of California-San Diego, “The capability of GPS to measure watershed hydrology

Kira Olsen, NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, “Icequakes on Enceladus: Investigation into tidally modulated seismicity at icy rifts using an Antarctic analog

Talks will be 20 minutes with questions to follow. The Zoom link opens at 7:30 PM for socializing. Formal program begins at 8 PM Eastern time.

To insure that our speakers are able to present their talks without any distractions or disruptions, the meeting will be locked 15 minutes after the formal program begins, after which time new attendees will only be allowed into the meeting room between talks (the waiting room will be enabled for anyone trying to enter the meeting during a talk. Further details, including the Zoom link to the talk, will be sent to members shortly. For non-members: Please e-mail Mong-Han Huang (mhhuang [at] umd.edu) for the Zoom link

The 2020 Bradley Lecture

Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020

Meeting #1559

David Mogk, Montana State University, “Geoethics in an Uncertain World

TALK WILL be 60 MINUTES w/QUESTIONS TO FOLLOW

Formal program at 8:00 pm EST

*** Meeting to be held virtually via Zoom***

Meeting flyer to print out and post in your living room.

As a continuing effort to ensure that our speakers are able to present their talks without any distractions/disruptions, the meeting will be locked 15 minutes after the formal program begins, after which time new attendees will only be allowed into the meeting between talks (the waiting room will be enabled for anyone trying to enter the meeting during a talk). To Attend: Please e-mail Abraham Padilla (apadilla [at] usgs.gov) for the Zoom link.

GSW 1557: Eruptions, asteroid sample return, & salt on Mars

WEDNESDAY, Sept 23, 2020

MEETING #1557

Megan Newcombe, University of Maryland, “The final countdown to eruptions: short-timescale diffusion clocks for studying conduit processes”

Erica Jawin, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, “OSIRIS-REx, NASA’s Asteroid Sample Return Mission to 101955 Bennu”

Kathleen Benison, West Virginia University, “Salt on Mars: Astrobiological Tombs?”

TALKS WILL BE 20 MINUTES w/ QUESTIONS TO FOLLOW


Zoom link active at 7:30 pm EDT for socializing

Formal program at 8:00 pm EDT

*** Meeting to be held virtually via Zoom***

As a continued effort to ensure that our speakers are able to present their talks without any distractions/disruptions, the meeting will be locked 15 minutes after the formal program begins, after which time new attendees will only be allowed into the meeting between talks (the waiting room will be enable for anyone trying to enter the meeting during a talk). To Attend: Please e-mail Abraham Padilla (apadilla@usgs.gov) for the Zoom link.

GSW 1555: deltas, soil, & Chinese dinosaurs

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2020
MEETING # 1555

***Meeting to be held virtually via Zoom***
Note that the meeting will be “locked” (no admittance) once the
formal program begins.

JAMES CLARK, The George Washington University
Dinosaur Hunting in China

ROBERT MAHON, The University of New Orleans
Universality of delta channel bifurcation angles

ASMERET ASEFAW BERHE, University of California, Merced
What’s soil got to do with climate change?

TALKS WILL BE 20 MINUTES w/ QUESTIONS TO FOLLOW
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Zoom link active at 7:30 p.m. EDT for socializing
Formal program at 8:00 p.m. EDT

Meeting flyer to print out and post in your living room.

Virtual GSW 1554: slate of speakers

WEDNESDAY, April 29, 2020
MEETING # 1554

***Note: meeting to be held virtually via Zoom; link will be shared with members via email***

STEPHANIE SPERA, University of Richmond
Sacrifice Zone or Sustainable Agricultural Powerhouse: The
Brazilian Cerrado

AARON VELASCO, The University of Texas at El Paso
Developing Strong International Partnerships for Geoscience
Advances and Capacity Building

CHARLES BACON, U.S. Geological Survey
Lidar imaging of Mazama eruption deposits and postglacial fault
scarps at Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

TALKS WILL BE 20 MINUTES w/ QUESTIONS TO FOLLOW
___________________________________
Formal program at 8:00 p.m. EDT; informal socializing starts at 7:30pm

***Meeting will be held virtually via Zoom; link will be shared with members via email***

GSW virtual meeting : La Brea, Faux Folds, and atmospheric radiation

The Geological Society of Washington
founded 1893, never online until 2020

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2020
MEETING # 1553

***Note meeting to be held virtually via Zoom***

GRAHAM ANDREWS, West Virginia University
The Fold Illusion

DAVID CHU, Los Alamos National Lab
DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: the MOSAiC Expedition

ALEXIS MYCHAJLIW, La Brea Tar Pits & Museum
“Tar pit” time capsules: reconstructing Trinidad’s Late Pleistocene ecosystems with fossils trapped in asphalt

TALKS WILL BE 20 MINUTES w/ QUESTIONS TO FOLLOW

___________________________________
Formal program at 8:00 p.m. EDT, show up with a drink of your choice at 7:30pm if you’re keen on socializing beforehand.

***Meeting will be held virtually via Zoom using the link below***
https://vccs.zoom.us/j/881922420

www.gswweb.org

GSW 1552 at AGU HQ: Martian fans, wet meteorites, and forensic petrology

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2020
MEETING # 1552

***Note alternate location***

Alexander Morgan, SI National Air and Space Museum
Large alluvial fans on Mars: insights from remote sensing observations and field analogue studies

Kei Shimizu, Carnegie Institution of Science
Water in meteorites: a snapshot of water in the early Solar System

Daniel Rasmussen, SI National Museum of Natural History
The run-up to volcanic eruptions unveiled by forensic petrology

TALKS WILL BE 20 MINUTES w/ QUESTIONS TO FOLLOW

___________________________________

Refreshments at 7:30 p.m. Formal program at 8:00 p.m.

***American Geophysical Union Headquarters***
2000 Florida Avenue NW, Washington, DC

Our next meeting in a new location, the American Geophysical Union’s headquarters at 2000 Florida Ave., NW, Washington,DC 20009. If you would like to participate in the 7pm tour of AGU’s newly-renovated LEEDS-certified, net-zero building, you must sign up in advance, with this Google form.

If you only plan to attend the 8pm meeting, then you do not need to sign up.

AGU is located at 2000 Florida Ave, N.W. AGU strongly encourages the use of public transportation and ride sharing/carpooling. The nearest metro stop is Dupont Circle, on the Red Line; we are just about 3 blocks north of the station. The most convenient parking garage is located in the Universal Building and is accessible from two points: (1) Universal North, accessed from T Street, NW, across from the side entrance of the Hilton Washington, and (2) Universal South, accessed from Florida Avenue, NW, across from the front entrance of AGU. (best access for evening activities). There is some street parking for those who are resourceful; most is metered and/or has residential restrictions. Attached is a map showing the metro & parking locations.

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Meeting flyer to print and post at  your institution.

Next GSW meeting will be at AGU headquarters

We will have our next meeting in a new location, the American Geophysical Union’s headquarters at 2000 Florida Ave., NW, Washington,DC 20009. If you would like to participate in the 7pm tour of AGU’s newly-renovated LEEDS-certified, net-zero building, you must sign up in advance, with this Google form.

If you only plan to attend the 8pm meeting, then you do not need to sign up.

AGU is located at 2000 Florida Ave, N.W. AGU strongly encourages the use of public transportation and ride sharing/carpooling. The nearest metro stop is Dupont Circle, on the Red Line; we are just about 3 blocks north of the station. The most convenient parking garage is located in the Universal Building and is accessible from two points: (1) Universal North, accessed from T Street, NW, across from the side entrance of the Hilton Washington, and (2) Universal South, accessed from Florida Avenue, NW, across from the front entrance of AGU. (best access for evening activities). There is some street parking for those who are resourceful; most is metered and/or has residential restrictions. Attached is a map showing the metro & parking locations.